Anne Hardy, Tate Winter commission 2020
Written by Virginia Bianchi
Published on 26 April 2020

Metro and bus stops are located a few minutes away from Tate Britain in Millbank, London. For this reason, while walking towards the museum, the visitor unintentionally experiences the installation The Depth of Darkness, hearing its roaring sound effects without knowing where they come from. The nearer to the entrance, the more the visitor wonders what those blaring sounds can be, which evoke the roar of waves and cover the loud noises of the metropolis.

She turns the corner, sees the violet lighting installed in an apparently cluttered way on the façade of the museum, as if it had been victim of an intense tempest. On the wide entrance stairs, she sees small whitish, shiny shapes recalling semi melted ice pieces, together with irregular surfaces that seem wet cloths and other objects such as containers and plastic bottles. This post apocalyptic vision is completed by tore fabrics adorning the six spaces usually for the museum banners.

Anne Hardy, the British artist who created the installation, transformed one of the most popular museums in the world in a seemingly deserted building, victim of an imaginary, future apocalypse caused by global warming. The artist transports us into a different era, a dystopian world from the future where nature takes back the control of the planet and makes human beings defenceless in front of its dominance, just like the visitor feels at the mercy of the installation.

The audio track in continuous repetition penetrates our beings and touches us deep inside, making indifference impossible in front of an artworks of such power.

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